Association of Inclusionist Wikipedians

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AIW: Association of Inclusionist Wikipedians
Sometimes, editors create just the basic framework of an article, with the intention of coming back to fill it in later, or for others to do so.
An underdeveloped article is just like this house under construction. Lend a hand, don't tear it down!
A building, like an article, takes time to build. Imagine if this building were constantly ripped apart at the seams during construction!

Check out the WikiProject Inclusion page!

The motto of the Association of Inclusionist Wikipedians is Conservata veritate, which translates to, "with truth preserved." This motto reflects a desire to change Wikipedia only when no knowledge would be lost as a result.

There is now a place where inclusionist Wikipedians can voice their opinions and further our agenda of building the world's largest and most complete professional encyclopedia.

This association is established and based on the idea that Wikipedia is not paper: Wikipedia is not a paper encyclopedia, and thus has few size limits. Because Wikipedia is not on paper, it can include organized and structured links, can be more timely, etc. It also means that the style and length of writing appropriate for paper is not necessarily appropriate here.

Membership is open to everyone. To discuss inclusionism, please do so freely on the talk page.

To join this association simply copy and paste:
{{inclusionist}}
to your user page.

Goals[edit]

Parthenon
  • To continuously improve Wikipedia and make it the most comprehensive source of reliable encyclopedic information available on the planet.
  • Support Wikipedia's premise to be comprised of the sum of all human knowledge, freely accessible to all humans.
  • Never use personal attacks, it's topics we discuss here. When an article is deleted, it can cause the creator to call the one who deleted it names. But we as an association shall only discuss over issues, and not attacking people and calling them names.

How to join and list of members[edit]

All you have to do to become a member is copy and paste:
{{inclusionist}}
to your user page

List of members[edit]

Arguments against article deletion[edit]

A deletionist sentiment: "Too many unnoteworthy or obscure articles impede finding the relevant stuff, like trying to find a needle in a haystack." — This notion is outdated, in part because the Wikipedia search engine was updated and improved in 2010, in which "Search suggestions are now improved to get you to the page you are looking for more quickly," as reported on the Wikimedia blog on May 13, 2010. (link: "A new look for Wikipedia".
  • Deletionism goes against the premise of Wikipedia: "Imagine a world in which every single person on the planet is given free access to the sum of all human knowledge. That's what we're doing." — Jimmy Wales, The founder of Wikipedia.
  • Notability of articles is sometimes very subjective. For some, the US presidential candidate John Anderson might be a noted person; others who don't live in the United States might feel that Scottish scientist John Anderson is more prominent.
  • It can be discouraging when articles created by first-time contributors and newer users are deleted without (in their opinion) a good reason. In their view, at least, the subject matter is noteworthy.
  • Instead of deleting articles altogether, they can sometimes be merged with other articles (see Mergism).
  • Article additions and expansions, and allowing time for them to occur, is highly superior to simply deleting articles.
  • It's easy to criticize and delete, whereas it's much more difficult to do research and create content.
  • Deleting a well-written, well-sourced article on the basis of notability can reduce the amount of valuable information on Wikipedia.
  • It can be frustrating for a reader to come to Wikipedia for information and inside find that the relevant article existed at one point but has been deleted. This discourages both Wikipedia readership and authorship.
  • Deleting an article on the basis of notability both reduces Wikipedia to the level of traditional encyclopedias (which won't cover topics that Wikipedia will for various reasons, including notability), but also doesn't provide the oversight that a traditional encyclopedia has to justify it trimming articles. Part of the reason people use Wikipedia is that it is a vibrant source of obscure knowledge, especially about obscure topics that aren't covered in a more traditional encyclopedia. Other methods of ensuring quality, such as labeling a page "In Need of Editing and Sources", are more than enough to correct problems.
  • The Wikipedia search engine was updated and improved in 2010, in which "Search suggestions are now improved to get you to the page you are looking for more quickly," as reported on the Wikimedia blog on May 13, 2010. (link: "A new look for Wikipedia".) This serves to nullify the deletionist argument that "too many unnoteworthy or obscure articles impede finding the relevant stuff..." in Wikipedia searches.
  • Search, categorization, and other technical measures for organization can diminish the difficulty in finding information even when there are many articles about insignificant subjects.
  • Deletionists may subjectively pick-and-choose from a long and diverse list of Wikipedia notability and other guidelines as a rationale for the blanket deletion of an article. When one chosen standard is disproven, another rule is searched for and then stated as a rationale for deletion.
  • Deletionists may use absolutist rationales and stances to justify article deletion. A notable example in Articles for deletion logs is arguing that absolutely no reliable sources exist to establish notability for and/or verify an article, while utilizing only one brief search for news and other sources, such as on Google or Google news, to qualify the statement. Sometimes it takes only seconds to disqualify such statements by utilizing web searches in other mediums, particularly those that are empirical, research-based, and lack a profit motive.

“Imagine a world in which every single person on the planet is given free access to the sum of all human knowledge. That's what we're doing.”

Jimmy Wales, The founder of Wikipedia

More Association of Inclusionists pages[edit]

A deletionist sentiment: Wikipedia needs to be cleaned up! — Why not cleanup, verify and expand articles, rather than simply deleting them?
Add the '''{{Rescue}}''' template to any article at AfD worth saving

See also[edit]

Other languages than English[edit]

Essays[edit]

Other Wikipedian associations[edit]

References[edit]