User talk:Philippe (WMF)

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Heads up[edit]

Belongs to WMF?[edit]

Hello, Philippe.

I was recently blocked on English Wikipedia for an alleged outing after I was trying to add some evidence to my arbitration case. The evidence was from gmane.org.wikimedia.mediawiki.bugs. Does this belong to WMF?

Thank you in advance.

Regards, — Neotarf (talk) 17:56, 1 December 2014 (UTC)

It's complicated. While gmane.org does not belong to us, it is a mirror of a mailing list and/or bug reports that are hosted on systems that do belong to us. Philippe Beaudette, Wikimedia Foundation (talk) 18:22, 1 December 2014 (UTC)

Email[edit]

I send you another, but am not sure you received it. Thank you. 153.0.91.45 10:02, 26 December 2014 (UTC)

It's me, Anna Frodesiak, by the way. :) 153.0.91.45 13:59, 28 December 2014 (UTC)
Just a reminder to please return my emails. I've been waiting for a reply for around two months now. If you are having some sort of trouble with my email address or yours, please say. Thank you. Anna Frodesiak (talk) 00:02, 5 February 2015 (UTC)

two questions[edit]

Hello Philippe. Not to bother you too much, but since you are familiar with my SPI (non-existent) "case" at Wikipedia, maybe you could help me with two questions.

First question: in the "investigation", Toddst1 (the admin who blocked me) identified me, among other things, as "Daniel Tomé who placed 34th in the tournament." I had never mentioned on-wiki which place I took in that 2012 world tournament, but, even ignoring that, I really don't understand why it would be a relevant detail to mention, other than to identify me personally – even if I had finished in 1st place, or 56th place, what bearing could that have on the SPI?

Second question: if checkusers aren't supposed to publicly link IPs to specific accounts, for security reasons, why are other users allowed to do it by just calling them "Suspected"? Although this is an abstract question, I'll give you my own example again: here, I see 4 IPs linked to my name. Of course I didn't use those IPs, but let's pretend I did use them: couldn't that page put me in physical danger by revealing my location? So why are such pages allowed?

Thanks, and sorry to take up your time with this. ~ DanielTom (talk) 23:50, 28 January 2015 (UTC)

Global Bans[edit]

Dear Philippe, today I noticed the WMFOffice blocking an account with the rationale Account operated by/for WMF banned user. It would be useful if you could detail precisely under what circumstances the WMF will block an account with the rationale Account operated for WMF banned user. I'm increasingly concerned that users uploading work for which OTRS permission was obtained by a now banned user could be targeted under this new power that the WMF has given itself. Nick (talk) 00:09, 31 January 2015 (UTC)

I find it difficult to think of such a circumstance, and think instead that it reflects clumsy wording choice by the person doing the lock. I'm not interested in playing proxy-editing whack-a-mole games.... I can't eliminate the possibility that we might act if, for instance, we were able to conclusively demonstrate (to the level that meets the standard for action) that someone was running an account that was a proxy for a banned editor - that is, the editor wrote and prepared everything, but a proxy editor actually pressed the upload/edit button, but I think that circumstance is fairly unlikely. Philippe Beaudette, Wikimedia Foundation (talk) 17:53, 31 January 2015 (UTC)

Obtaining suppressed content[edit]

Hello, Philippe.

During the recent Gender Gap Arbitration case, I requested access to suppressed edits that were used as evidence against me. At the time, Mr. Wales indicated that "it is important in ArbCom cases that people not be punished based on evidence that they haven't seen or are not allowed the chance to rebut." [1]

However, after the case closed, I was informed by an arbitrator by email that "We don't provide suppressed content. Edits are only suppressed under a few narrow criteria, and it's important that suppressed material remains private." Is there someone who can provide me with the contents of my own edits so I can have a chance to evaluate and respond to them? The edits in question were added to the case here: [2]

Regards,

Neotarf (talk) 02:59, 31 January 2015 (UTC)

@Neotarf: enWP is a self-managed wiki, and Wikimedia staff don't have the ability to override a decision of an Arbitration Committee with regard to suppression. You will need to go back to enWP's committee via the mailing list and appeal the decision of an aribtrator. You have the opinions that you wish to have to cite. One would think that the concept of natural justice would allow for your edits to be provided to you, and the issue of facing your accused, where your words are the accuser is a worthy argument, similarly if they are using your commentary as evidence against you.  — billinghurst sDrewth 14:29, 31 January 2015 (UTC)
As billinghurst said, I don't think it would be appropriate for me to provide those edits. I do, however, stand with him in thinking that you should be told what evidence is being used against you, if you have not been. Philippe Beaudette, Wikimedia Foundation (talk) 17:54, 31 January 2015 (UTC)
Thank you both for your responses. The situations are both stale, one is four months old and the other seven, so I would certainly like to see the actual edits, if for no other reason than to refresh my memory. In addition, if I remember correctly, one of the edits that is being attributed to me was in fact made by another user. I think the Committee should also have the opportunity to see these edits. I will take this issue back to the Committee, per the above recommendations.
There is another issue, also involving suppression of edits, which I have not been able to get resolved, but I will start a new section for it. Regards, —Neotarf (talk) 23:58, 1 February 2015 (UTC)

Privacy policy enforcement[edit]

Who is responsible for enforcement of Wikimedia Foundation Privacy Policy and investigation of any subsequent repercussions or harassment?

The policy specifies 17 types of information that are regarded as "personal information". It defines "personal information" as "information you provide us or information we collect from you that could be used to personally identify you."

The oversight group has dismissed some concerns I brought to their attention, citing the Wikipedia:Oversight policy, and saying this personal information is insignificant and "not considered oversightable material". An arbitrator has told me that "these are as personally identifying as a mention of your being a human being would be." Other issues that have been raised are that no action can be taken unless an editor can be "identified" or "endangered". Endangerment would seem difficult to prove until it has actually happened--it seems to me the reason for the policy is to prevent identification and endangerment. And hasn't the Foundation already defined the types of information that "could be used to personally identify you" in the policy itself? Another issue raised is whether the Arbitration committee can revoke these privacy provisions by sanctioning a user.

Are there any channels I can go through where my concerns will be taken seriously or where this can be resolved?

Regards, —Neotarf (talk) 02:23, 2 February 2015 (UTC)

Well, although it is usually focused on CheckUser rather than Suppression, the "...ombudsman commission investigates complaints about violations of the privacy policy," so absent any other response I would presume this is your first point of contact. QuiteUnusual (talk) 08:49, 2 February 2015 (UTC)
Some of my concerns involve off-wiki violations, apparently by individuals named in the recent Gender Gap case. —Neotarf (talk) 19:51, 2 February 2015 (UTC)
The ombudsmen are the appropriate entry point for something of this nature, I believe. If/when they are over their heads, they have shown no reluctance to approach WMF staff for assistance.  :) Philippe Beaudette, Wikimedia Foundation (talk) 20:12, 2 February 2015 (UTC)


Disqualification of my candidature for stewards elections[edit]

My candidature was denied with the argument I did not grant the prove of my identity to Wikimedia foundation in time. I sent the documents to info@wikimedia.org on 28th of January 2015. My identity is also publically very well known. I have Iearned in the meanwhile that the correct address would have been secure-info@wikimedia.org. But even if that is trough it would not be fair not to consider my candidature for such a formal reason – Wikimedia did get the my information on their main address and it would just be fair to redirect them to the right address or than to respond to me that I did send the documents to the wrong address. As there is still time to check my documents I cannot understand that you Wikimedia will this case not handle with generosity and fairness and so I appeal to you to reconsider this case and accept my candidature.DidiWeidmann (talk) 17:13, 8 February 2015 (UTC)

It's not mine to reconsider, actually. I have no formal role with the steward elections, which are self-organized and self-policed, beyond simply verifying the info that is sent to secure-info and providing any informal advice the stewards request. However, I understand that your identification was located and you were allowed to stand as a candidate, so that sounds like the best possible outcome. My apologies for the delayed response, I've been out of the office. Philippe Beaudette, Wikimedia Foundation (talk) 03:18, 12 February 2015 (UTC)

Question about comments on confirmation pages[edit]

See here. It might be good to reply there. Trijnsteltalk 21:27, 12 February 2015 (UTC)

Same here, apparently Philippe just logged in with the wrong account. odder (talk) 14:58, 14 February 2015 (UTC)

Identity Theft[edit]

Hi Philippe,

How are you doing? It has been a while. I was hoping you can help me out with something:

I requested the Dutch ARBCOM to rethink my never ending block I have there, and something came up. There is now a user Trijnstel that is claiming that I did identity theft or identity fraud when I both identified Abigor and Delay to the foundation. (https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overleg_Wikipedia:Arbitragecommissie/Zaken/Deblokkade_verzoek:_Abigor) Can you kindly confirm that both where done with my own passport, no other identification where done? Its kind of a big claim, and a big deal for me to sort it out.


I know that some things went wrong, and things escalated quickly while they shouldn't have, but no law's where broken while doing it. There is no identify theft nor fraud in the game. Huib talk Abigor 18:26, 18 February 2015 (UTC)

I'm sorry, but I can't confirm that. I have no recollection of what identification documents were used for those two accounts, and we do not store them. I can say this: I do not recall there being any duplicity, but I do not recall that there was not either. I'm sorry that I can't be of more help on the issue. Philippe Beaudette, Wikimedia Foundation (talk) 20:41, 18 February 2015 (UTC)

Philippe, no worries. The first one was handled by Cary and Erik for the LiCom and you handled the one for the user:Delay. This makes it even impossible for you to remember it if they don't get stored. Thanks! :) Huib talk Abigor 20:50, 18 February 2015 (UTC)

Wikimedia blog[edit]

Hello, I sent an email to the blog mailing list two days ago, but I got a message saying it was moderated. Then nothing. Who is in charge of blogs ? I have an entry to propose :) Anthere (talk) 15:20, 19 February 2015 (UTC)

Replied at here. In general, it's best to follow the instructions at Wikimedia Blog#Drafting a post. Regards, Tbayer (WMF) (talk) 15:52, 19 February 2015 (UTC)

Daniel Higgins[edit]

Hello Philippe. An anonymous user created User:DHiggins (WMF), but there's no such user on any wiki. Is this a valid user page? —Pathoschild 03:09, 03 March 2015 (UTC)