Froulju en genderferskaat op Wikimedia

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Ada King, Countess of Lovelace, is often described as the world's first computer programmer. Public Domain

Can you help find high-quality articles that celebrate women and gender diversity on Wikipedia and sister sites?

This month recognizes women around the world. In honor of International Women’s Day, the Wikimedia community’s own WikiWomen’s History Month, and the new Wikimedia Foundation's Inspire Campaign, we're highlighting notable women and themes related to gender diversity this month on the Wikimedia Blog.

What are your favorite, high-quality Wikipedia articles about notable women? What are your favorite, high-quality articles about gender diversity?

We're looking for factual, well-written and insightful articles, from the wiki of your choice. Articles that do not meet this criteria will not be considered.

Please add your suggestions below. Be sure to include a link to your favorite -- and a sentence or two about why you picked it (e.g.: what did you learn from this article?).

We also invite you to add your +1’s for articles you think are most insightful, to help select our top picks for our report later this month.

Please post your recommendations here until March 15, 2015. We will then prepare a report about our favorites, and publish it on the Wikimedia blog the following week.

Thanks for helping surface quality content on this important topic!

The Communications team at the Wikimedia Foundation


Biographies

Please recommend high-quality biographical articles about notable women, from the wiki of your choice. Or add your +1 for good articles that inspire you.

Ada Lovelace

Ada Lovelace Chalon portrait.jpg

  • Suggested by: Fabrice Florin (WMF)
  • Why I recommend it: Ada Lovelace wrote what is recognized as the first algorithm intended to be carried out by a machine. Because of this, she is often described as the world's first computer programmer. This article is factual and well-written; it features a woman that's an inspiration to many people, particularly in the technology community.
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)


Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai at Girl Summit 2014.jpg

  • Suggested by: Fabrice Florin (WMF)
  • Why I recommend it: Malala Yousafzai is the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate. She is known for human rights advocacy for education and for women in northwest Pakistan, where she faced abuse from the local Taliban. Her advocacy has since grown into an international movement. This article is informative, in-depth and well-researched; it's about an inspiring young woman that's shown exceptional courage and started an international movement.
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)


Hillary Rodham Clinton

Hillary Clinton official Secretary of State portrait crop.jpg

  • Suggested by: Fabrice Florin (WMF)
  • Why I recommend it: Hillary Clinton is an influential figure in American politics, having served as Secretary of State, U.S. Senator, First Lady -- and as a leading candidate for the U.S. presidency. She is an advocate of "smart power" that combines diplomacy with military power, and has encouraged empowerment of women everywhere. I found this article factual, fair and thorough.
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)


Abagail Adams

Abigail Adams.jpg

  • Suggested by: VGrigas (WMF) (talk) 18:49, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
  • Why I recommend it: I've admired her influence at a time when women weren't allowed to hold political office. I also love her quotes.
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)


Emma Goldman

Emma goldman 1886.jpg

  • Suggested by: Kaldari
  • Why I recommend it: Featured article. "The most dangerous woman in America."
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)
  • VGrigas (WMF) (talk) 19:18, 20 March 2015 (UTC)
  • Duckduckstop (talk) 00:44, 22 March 2015 (UTC)


Hedy Lamarr

  • Suggested by: Katherine (WMF) (talk) 07:51, 5 March 2015 (UTC)
  • Why I recommend it: Lamarr is known primarily as an actress, despite being instrumental in making WiFi, Bluetooth, and CDMA mobile telephony possible -- all in the name of defeating the Nazi war effort.
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)


Jane Jacobs

Jane Jacobs.jpg

  • Suggested by: Katherine (WMF) (talk) 07:51, 5 March 2015 (UTC)
  • Why I recommend it: As the world re-urbanizes, we have Jane Jacobs to thank for the preservation of walkable, community-oriented urban planning (especially in the U.S.) Jacobs mobilized New York City against the urban planning policies of brutalist utilitarian Robert Moses, preserving the city's iconic neighborhoods. She had real flaws, but her work was undeniably prescient.
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)


Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ruth Bader Ginsburg official SCOTUS portrait.jpg

  • Suggested by: Katherine (WMF) (talk) 07:59, 5 March 2015 (UTC)
  • Why I recommend it: Ginsburg is a member of the Supreme Court of the United States, the second female judge ever appointed, and the first Jewish female judge in the court's history. She is also 81 years old, and has a healthy sense of her own vitality and influence.
  • +1: Jane023 (talk) 07:56, 22 March 2015 (UTC)
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)


Navi Pillay

Navi Pillay June 2014.jpg

  • Suggested by: Katherine (WMF) (talk) 07:58, 5 March 2015 (UTC)
  • Why I recommend it: Pillay is a South African human rights lawyer who most recently served as the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. She defended anti-apartheid activists while breaking color and gender barriers as a jurist in South Africa, before becoming a respected international human rights jurist.
  • +1: Mary Mark Ockerbloom (talk) 16:12, 28 March 2015 (UTC)
  • VGrigas (WMF) (talk) 19:19, 20 March 2015 (UTC)


Anne Frank

Anne Frank

  • Suggested by: Andrew (WMF)
  • Why I recommend it: Anne Frank is a very inspirational women who persevered, for a short time, while the odds where against her.
  • +1: She's also gets the most page hits per month of any Dutch woman on the English Wikipedia, though she was born in Germany. Jane023 (talk) 07:56, 22 March 2015 (UTC)
  • +1, Though she lived in Europe, Ann is very popular all over the globe. --Netha Hussain (talk) 20:35, 28 March 2015 (UTC)
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)


For more ideas of articles to suggest, check out this list from WikiProject Women's History.


Dorothy Bishop

Professor Dorothy Bishop FBA FMedSci FRS.jpg

  • Suggested by Duncan Hull

Carole Goble

Carole Goble by Rob Whitrow (15682291039).jpg

  • Suggested by Duncan Hull

Anne Glover

EU 2050 Europe's Tech Revolution - Anne Glover (1).jpg

  • Suggested by Duncan Hull

Wendy Hall

Wendy hall 2011.jpg

  • Suggested by Duncan Hull

Athene Donald

Athene Donald (cropped).jpg

  • Suggested by Duncan Hull

Sally Davies

Dame Sally Davies FMedSci DBE FRS.jpg

  • Suggested by Duncan Hull


Janet Thornton

Plos thornton.jpg

  • Suggested by Duncan Hull

Maryam Mirzakhani

  • Suggested by Duncan Hull

Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz

Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz

  • Suggested by: --ProtoplasmaKid (WM-MX) (talk) 03:07, 6 March 2015 (UTC)
  • Why I recommend it: Great content and edited by many editors, even being a featured article, is a content that can grow much more.
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)


Corazon Aquino

Corazon Aquino 1986.jpg

  • Suggested by: jewel457
  • Why I recommend it: She is the first female President in Asia. Prior to that, she has not held any elected position in government, she is said to be "the housewife that launched a revolution."
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)


Patricia Locke (Tawacin WasteWin)

180px

  • Suggested by: Wiki-uk
  • Why I recommend it: For her work in promoting, preserving and maintaining indigenous languages and cultures.
    • I've added her photo, but I notice it is listed under a Non-free media information and use rationale, could it be used here?
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)

Barbara McClintock

Barbara McClintock (1902-1992) shown in her laboratory in 1947.jpg

  • Suggested by: Keilana
  • Why I recommend it: She was the queen of cytogenetics, and discovered several important concepts that make everything about modern molecular genetics possible. And of course, she was ignored by the scientific establishment for years. (But it all ends well - she got the Nobel Prize!)
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)

Rosalind Franklin

  • Suggested by: Mohsindalvi18031987
  • Why I recommend it: Rosalind Franklin was instrumental in deciphering the structure of DNA, which today is the cornerstone of modern medicine. In 1952, whilst at King's College, London, she and Raymond Gosling obtained exceptionally clear diffraction pictures of DNA (see Photo 51) and also discovered that there were two forms of DNA. It is alleged that sexism, workplace conflict and her aversion towards reaching to premature conclusions robbed her from sharing (posthumously) the 1962 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for decoding the structure of DNA alongwith James Watson, Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins. In 1953, she joined Birkbeck College, London and by 1956, she and Donald Caspar decoded the structure of the tobacco mosaic virus, an RNA virus. Due to long exposure to X-rays, she developed ovarian tumors and died young at 37 years of age.
  • Franklin was a chemist, X-ray crystallographer and experimenter par excellence, yet received no award or recognition in her lifetime. It is only recently that the scientific community has begun to notice and appreciate her work.
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)
    • Er Mohsin Dalvi
    • Fabrice Florin (WMF) (talk) 23:00, 27 March 2015 (UTC) - Rosalind Franklin did much of the hard work to reveal the helical structure of DNA through X-Ray diffraction images -- enabling Jim Watson and Francis Crick to win a Nobel prize, based in part on her work. Many think she should have received more recognition for her invaluable contributions towards solving the mystery of how life reproduces itself.

Anne Killigrew

Anne Killigrew (1660–1685)

  • Suggested by: Mary Mark Ockerbloom
  • Why I recommend it: Temporal diversity; Stunning poet and painter at a time when few women did either.
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)

Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw

Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw

  • Suggested by: Mary Mark Ockerbloom
  • Why I recommend it: Cultural diversity; One of the Financial Times top 50 women in business; impressive success after being told that she would not be hired in a male-dominated field.
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)

Elaine Oran

Elaine Oran

  • Suggested by: Mary Mark Ockerbloom
  • Why I recommend it: Amazing scientist; world authority on numerical methods for large-scale simulation of physical systems which are used by many other scientists to model everything from supernovae to schools of fish.
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)

Fanny Bullock Workman

Fanny Bullock Workman

  • Suggested by: Mary Mark Ockerbloom
  • Why I recommend it: FA already, traveler, mountaineer, writer, supported women suffrage, comments on conditions for women internationally in her travel books
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)

Makinti Napanangka

180px

    • this is a non-free use image, could it be used for this?
  • Suggested by: Mary Mark Ockerbloom
  • Why I recommend it: FA already, amazing Indigenous Australian artist
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)

Sandra bem

Your article thumbnail (180px)

  • Suggested by: Tracy Hartford
  • Why I recommend it: American psychologist known for working in gender studies.
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)


Anita Sarkeesian

Anita Sarkeesian headshot.jpg

  • Suggested by: User:Glitchygirl
  • Why I recommend it: Anita Sarkeesian is at the forefront of women's studies in popular culture. Her essays and video blogs have been used to teach university-level courses, amassed readers and viewers in the millions, and intend to create a renewed taste for originality and diversity in modern media. I think, although it is not a good or featured article (as I think it should be crafted into), it conveys that well.
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)

Florence Violet McKenzie

Florence Violet McKenzie in WESC uniform.jpg

  • Suggested by: Wittylama (talk)
  • Why I recommend it: Australia's first female electrical engineer, "Mrs Mac" had a fantastically interesting and trailblazing life, pushing all along the way to give greater access to technical education for women. Two days before she died she declared, "...it is finished, and I have proved to them all that women can be as good as, or better than men." I wrote this article using free-licensed biographies and brought it to GA class. It is the highest quality Wikipedia biography of a woman from Sydney or New South Wales (all higher quality biographies of Australian women are of sports/music stars).
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)


Susan Sontag

Susan Sontag by Juan Bastos.JPG

  • Suggested by: Jane023
  • Susan Sontag made me think about photography and why I bother with it as a female Wikipedian.
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)


Margaret Thatcher

Margaret Thatcher


  • Suggested by: Brian Caton
  • Why I recommend it: Write a sentence or two about why you picked this person and this biography. What did you learn from this article?
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)



Ma Rama Devi

Ma Rama Devi|180px


  • Suggested by: Your name
  • Why I recommend it: Write a sentence or two about why you picked this person and this biography. What did you learn from this article?
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)



Nancy Ward

Nancy Ward


  • Suggested by: Your name
  • Why I recommend it: Write a sentence or two about why you picked this person and this biography. What did you learn from this article?
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)




Pancho Barnes

Pancho Barnes


  • Suggested by: John Cheek
  • Why I recommend it: Write a sentence or two about why you picked this person and this biography. What did you learn from this article?
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)



Angela Merkel

Angela Merkel


  • Suggested by: Marco Mizrahi
  • Why I recommend it: Write a sentence or two about why you picked this person and this biography. What did you learn from this article?
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)



Clara S. Foltz

Clara S. Foltz


  • Suggested by: Marco Mizrahi
  • Why I recommend it: Write a sentence or two about why you picked this person and this biography. What did you learn from this article?
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)



Your article title and link

Your article thumbnail (180px)

  • Suggested by: Your name
  • Why I recommend it: Write a sentence or two about why you picked this person and this biography. What did you learn from this article?
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)


For more ideas of articles to suggest, check out this list from WikiProject Women's History.


Gender diversity

Please recommend high-quality articles about ideas, issues or movements related to gender diversity or gender equality, from the wiki of your choice. Or add your +1 for good articles that inspire you.

Gender

Hoverflies mating midair.jpg

  • Suggested by: Fabrice Florin (WMF)
  • Why I recommend it: This article is informative, thorough and nuanced. It was helpful for me to learn about some of the different characteristics of gender, from biological sex to social roles and gender identity.
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)


Feminism

[File:Ada Lovelace Chalon portrait.jpg

  • Suggested by: Fabrice Florin (WMF)
  • Why I recommend it: A good introduction to some of the movements and ideologies that seek to establish equal rights and opportunities for women in education and employment. The article seems factual, in-depth and well-sourced, with a lot of useful context about these important issues.
  • +1: Mary Mark Ockerbloom (talk) 19:40, 28 March 2015 (UTC) (sign here if you like it)


Your article title and link

Your article thumbnail (180px)

  • Suggested by: Your name
  • Why I recommend it: Write a sentence or two about why you picked this person and this biography. What did you learn from this article?
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)

For more ideas of articles to suggest, check out this list from WikiProject Women's History.


Did you know?

Please recommend insightful articles that reveal little-known facts about women and gender diversity, from the wiki of your choice. Or add your +1 for good articles that inspire you.

Women in piracy

Bonney, Anne (1697-1720).jpg


Women in popular legends

180px


Gulabi Gang

Smiles and determination of rural Indian women 3.jpg

Your article title and link

Your article thumbnail (180px)

  • Suggested by: Your name
  • Why I recommend it: Write a sentence or two about why you picked this person and this biography. What did you learn from this article?
  • +1: (sign here if you like it)


For more ideas of articles to suggest, check out this list from WikiProject Women's History.