Research:MoodBar/First month of activity

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MoodBar

Pilot: Early data
(July 2011 - September 2011)
Stage 1: Usage and UX
(September 2011 - May 2012)
Stage 2: Impact on editor engagement
(May 2012 - September 2012)
Nutshell.png
This page in a nutshell: This report describes an analysis of the first month of operation of MoodBar.

Research questions[edit]

MoodBar posts[edit]

  • What kind of users signal their mood?
  • How many users signal their mood?
  • At what point after registering an account do users post their mood?
  • What proportion of mood messages is tied to an edit transaction?
  • What proportion of mood posts contain a message?
  • Does mood type change as a function of user experience at the time when it was posted?
  • Can messages sent by MoodBar be easily categorized by type?
  • To what extent expressing mood positively affects the retention of new users?

Response to MoodBar posts[edit]

  • How long does it take for a new message to be seen and acted upon by other editors?
  • How many new users ever see a response to their MoodBar message?
  • How long does it take for a response to a new message to be seen by the sender?
  • Does a response to a MoodBar message affect the retention of the user who posted it?
  • To what extent the timing of a response affects the chance that the new user will read it?
  • Does the timing of a response affect new user retention?

Summary of results[edit]

Mood by category[edit]

Data collected during the first month indicates that most feedback submitted by new registered editors is of the "happy" type (58.6%), followed by "confused" (30.9%) and "sad" (10.5%). New editors tend to submit "happy" mood earlier in their user experience than "sad" or "confused" mood.

Mood with comments/transactional mood[edit]

75% of Moodbar events submitted by users include a non-null text comment, with a higher proportion of comments submitted in the "confused" (84.2%) and "sad" (81.4%) categories. A relatively small proportion of Moodbar events (10-12%) were submitted while editing, suggesting that feedback is not immediately linked to the edit transaction.

Moodbar events by category, proportion of events that include a comment and proportion of events triggered while editing.
Moodbar events by category, proportion of events that include a comment and proportion of events triggered while editing (users with 0 edits after registration)
Moodbar events by category, proportion of events that include a comment and proportion of events triggered while editing (users with 1 or more edits)