User:Wolliff (WMF)/Sandbox/Simple annual plan grants

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Background[edit]

The Wikimedia Foundation has initiated a project with TCC Group - a consulting firm focused on social impact - and the larger Wikimedia community, to help Wikimedia organizations (including chapters, thematic organizations, and user groups) improve their effectiveness and their ability to have impact for the movement. As part of this work, we are creating a self-assessment Questionnaire that organizations can use to understand how they are doing with strategies that may be essential for all or most Wikimedia organizations, as well as how they are doing with specific strategies that may not be used by all other organizations. In order to create the Questionnaire, User Guide, and Learning Center, TCC Group conducted a survey of Wikimedia organizations and a series of interviews to identify the different strategies Wikimedia organizations are already using. All of these materials evolved with the support and guidance of many different people within the movement including chapters, thematic organizations, user groups, and members of the Affiliations Committee. The contact for this project is Winifred Olliff at the Wikimedia Foundation: email wolliff at wikimedia dot org.

What is this Questionnaire?[edit]

The Questionnaire consists of a set of questions your organization will answer and an accompanying Learning Center to help your organization interpret the results. WMF may consider further developing this Questionnaire, if it is useful, to automatically generate customized reports for the organizations that complete the survey.

How do we use the Questionnaire part of the tool?[edit]

Before you begin, we recommend that each organization nominate one respondent to be the “point-person” for TCC and the Wikimedia Foundation, someone with overall responsibility for the tool and who will receive your results. Please have that person send an email to Winifred Olliff (email1>wolliff at wikimedia dot org) and Rika Gorn at TCC (email2>rgorn at tccgrp dot com</>). We suggest that between 3 and 7 individuals from your organization complete the Questionnaire on their own. These individuals should be volunteers or staff who have a deep understanding of how your organization operates, including how it makes decisions, what activities or strategies it engages in, and how its budget is allocated (if applicable). Remember that candid responses to these questions will help your organization get the most out of the tool, and that individual responses will not be shared with the Wikimedia Foundation or other Wikimedia organizations without your permission. The Questionnaire usually takes about 30-45 minutes to complete. If you have technical difficulties please contact Rika at TCC.

After all of the individuals in your group have completed the Questionnaire for your organization, your group’s point-person may request the aggregate results and use the accompanying User Guide and Learning Center on Meta-Wiki, to interpret and discuss the results. In this way, your organization can use the Questionnaire to understand your organization’s strengths and its gaps in effectiveness, and strategize about how to leverage those strengths and address those gaps to achieve greater impact.

Who will see my results?[edit]

We want to make sure this Questionnaire is useful to organizations and that individuals can respond openly to the questions here. So, individual results will not be shared with the Wikimedia Foundation or other Wikimedia organizations without the permission of the respondents. Your results will be compiled by TCC Group as part of an aggregate report about how Wikimedia organizations understand their own effectiveness, which we hope will be useful to the movement. In this report, findings will be averaged across many organizations so that individuals and individual organizations are not identified. Please contact us if you have concerns about having your responses included in this report.

Your organization’s group will see its own aggregated results, but the results of individual respondents will not be shared with your organization.

What do you mean by “Wikimedia organization”? Is this Questionnaire only for formal organizations?[edit]

Throughout, we use the phrase “Wikimedia organization” to refer to chapters, thematic organizations, and user groups. We use the word organization to refer to both formal organizations and informal groups. We hope this Questionnaire will be as useful to user groups as it is for Wikimedia chapters and thematic organizations, although we realize that some questions may be more applicable to one type of organization than another. If you find that this Questionnaire is not well-suited to your organization, we encourage you to share that feedback with us at the end of the Questionnaire so that we can improve future versions of this tool.

Why does this Questionnaire have different sections?[edit]

This Questionnaire has three sections. Section 1 asks some basic questions about how you work with your organization. Section 2 includes topics related to effectiveness (“core strategies”) that we hope are applicable to most or all organizations (these might be topics like volunteer recruitment or community engagement). Section 3 addresses specific strategies for effectiveness used by some organizations (these might be program strategies, like organizing events or doing advocacy work), and you will have the chance to indicate whether each question is applicable to you before you are asked to answer it.

We recognize and appreciate that many people participating in this Questionnaire may not use English as their first language. If you have any difficulty understanding questions or any other aspect of the Questionnaire, please reach out to Winifred Olliff (email wolliff at wikimedia dot org).

Section 1: Background Information[edit]

What is the name of your group or organization? [Drop down list]

How much time do you spend on activities related to your Wikimedia organization each week, on average?

  • Time slider.

What best describes your position or role at the Wikimedia organization you work with? (Please select all that apply.)

  • Volunteer
  • Program leader
  • Board member or group leader
  • Paid staff or contractor (temporary, part, or full-time)
  • Other

Section 2: Core Strategies for All Organizations[edit]

We have included some strategies that are probably used by all Wikimedia organizations. These include, (A) Work with volunteers, (B) Including people with different backgrounds, (C) Work with online contributors, (D) Learning and sharing learning, (E) Resource mobilization. Please answer each question, to the best of your knowledge.

Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statements about how your organization engages volunteers online and offline (or how volunteers engage your organization). By “volunteer” we mean anyone who gives time to your organization without financial compensation, including your organization’s core volunteers (for example, board members or project leads), and volunteers that help your organization with offline and online activities. In this case, we do not mean contributors to the Wikimedia sites unless they are directly engaged with your organization. You will have opportunities to answer questions about your work with online contributors later.

  • Roles: Volunteers always know what their roles in our organization are and what they should be doing in a given timeframe.
  • Roles: People in our organization (leadership, volunteers, staff) understand what the strengths, capabilities, and skills of volunteers are.
  • Roles: Volunteers in our organization always do things they are interested in doing.
  • Training: We train all volunteers.
  • Training: Our volunteer training makes volunteers more effective.
  • Training: We have a handbook or guide for volunteers, to help them work effectively.
  • Training: Our organization has regular meetings with volunteers to make sure they are supported, engaged, and working effectively.
  • Training: When a volunteer leaves our organization, we have a discussion with the volunteer to understand why.
  • Training: Volunteers have many opportunities to improve their skills and develop their interests.
  • Training: Our organization considers how volunteers are affected when we make decisions.
  • Recognition: New volunteers are formally welcomed and oriented.
  • Recognition:We recognize the contributions of volunteers through events, gifts, online badges, or verbal recognition (online or offline).
  • Flexibility: Volunteers have opportunities to change roles within our organization as their skills and interests develop.
  • Flexibility: Our organization depends on the work of just one or a few important volunteers.
  • Recruitment: We have documented and effective processes and strategies for recruiting new volunteers.
  • Recruitment: Our organization has enough volunteers to do what is needed for us to achieve impact.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in managing software development or technology work.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: We consult regularly with key stakeholders (technology volunteers, online contributors) to ensure our software development or technology work is relevant, and is not interfering with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization’s software development or technology work will lead to significant impact for the mission on a global scale.
  • Priorities: Our organization has a volunteer strategy, or a program that focuses specifically on volunteers.
  • What data does your organization collect about the ways your organization engages volunteers? This could be information that would help respond to the items above, or other information about how you use volunteers, that you might collect. Note that we are not looking for the specific information about your work with volunteers, but are more interested in what types of information you gather and how:


Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statements about how your organization includes people of different backgrounds (for example, people of different ages, races, genders, languages, expertise) in its work.

  • Our organization actively engages volunteers and online contributors from different backgrounds (for example different races, genders, languages, ages, with different expertise, etc.).
  • Our organization adopts a policy to prevent harassment and welcome newcomers, and makes other efforts to ensure all people are comfortable participating in both our in-person and online activities.
  • Our organization takes steps to make our projects, systems and technology easier to understand for first-time users with a variety of different backgrounds.
  • People involved with our organization believe more diversity (more participation among people of different backgrounds in our organization and on the Wikimedia projects) is a good thing for our organization and our projects.
  • Our organization actively seeks volunteers and online contributors who have different backgrounds, expertise and experience levels within the Wikimedia movement.
  • Our organization actively seeks volunteers and online contributors with expertise in needed areas (for example, academics, civil society organizations, business organizations, fundraising or financial experts, government).
  • Access to expertise and other resources: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in managing software development or technology work.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: We consult regularly with key stakeholders (technology volunteers, online contributors) to ensure our software development or technology work is relevant, and is not interfering with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization’s software development or technology work will lead to significant impact for the mission on a global scale.
  • What data does your organization collect on how inclusive and welcoming your organization is to people with different backgrounds? This could be information that would help respond to the items above, or other information about your organization’s receptiveness to different population groups. Note that we are not looking for the specific information about your work with online contributors, but are more interested in what types of information you gather and how:


Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statements about your organization’s work with online contributors (people doing work directly on the Wikimedia sites) that is focused on building communities through online and in-person activities.

  • Our organization supports and sustains healthy in-person communities of online contributors.
  • People in our organization (leadership, volunteers, staff) believe that building communities of online contributors will help our organization achieve more impact.
  • Our organization does activities in person and online that support and sustain healthy communities of online contributors.
  • Our organization has in-person events that support and sustain healthy communities.
  • Our organization’s activies for online contributors lead to measurable online impact (for example, online contributors become more active or contribute more content, or work together more effectively online).
  • Our organization engages contributors and volunteers online through activities like contests, online spaces (like the Teahouse on English Wikipedia), online support (like a help desk), or community consultations.
  • Our organization’s online activities for contributors lead to online impact (for example, online contributors become more active or contribute more content, or work together more effectively online).
  • Participants in our organization’s online and offline activities enjoy working together, online and/or offline.
  • Our organization consults effectively with online contributors before we make decisions.
  • Online contributors think our online and offline community-buildings are useful and effective.
  • The resources we use (time, money, stuff, expertise) to do community-building result in enough impact to justify the expense.
  • We have enough resources (time, money, stuff, expertise) to achieve impact through our community-building.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in managing software development or technology work.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: We consult regularly with key stakeholders (technology volunteers, online contributors) to ensure our software development or technology work is relevant, and is not interfering with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization’s software development or technology work will lead to significant impact for the mission on a global scale.
  • What data does your organization collect about its work with online contributors? This could be information related to the items above, or other information about what your interaction with the local community looks like. Note that we are not looking for the specific information about your work with online contributors, but are more interested in what types of information you gather and how:


Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statements about how your organization learns and shares.

  • Organizational learning: Our organization has effective ways to get feedback from volunteers, online contributors, and other key stakeholders.
  • Organizational learning: Our organization collects feedback from everyone involved (for example, volunteers, staff, leadership) to understand what is and is not working about our organization from their perspectives.
  • Organizational learning: Our organization systematically collects and documents information about how processes (meetings, communication, etc.) are working and can be improved.
  • Organizational learning: We assign roles for understanding how we can improve the way our organization functions.
  • Organizational learning: Our organization systematically collects and documents data from every activity we do to understand its impact (for example, how participants got involved with Wikimedia after an event).
  • Organizational learning: People in our organization believe learning from other Wikimedia organizations and nonprofit organizations is important.
  • Applying learning: Our organization regularly applies what we learn about our activities to make future activities more effective.
  • Environmental learning: Our organization systematically collects and documents information about our local context or area of focus (for example, about local laws, local organizations).
  • Environmental learning: Our organization has effective systems in place (for example meetings, online spaces that are used by the community) to share and discuss what we learn.
  • Environmental learning: Our organization understands what is happening in the field of open knowledge in our country/region or impacting our organization’s specific area of focus (for example, language, topic, project).
  • Environmental learning: Our organization collaborates effectively with others in the field of open knowledge.
  • Applying learning: Our organization’s strategies and activities are informed by information about what is happening around the world and locally (or in our focus area) in the field of open knowledge.
  • Applying learning: Our organization actively shares what we learn with other Wikimedia organizations and/or other nonprofit organizations (for example, through blog posts or informative grant reports or annual reports).
  • Applying learning: Our organization actively seeks out information from other Wikimedia organizations and/or other organizations.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in managing software development or technology work.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: We consult regularly with key stakeholders (technology volunteers, online contributors) to ensure our software development or technology work is relevant, and is not interfering with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization’s software development or technology work will lead to significant impact for the mission on a global scale.
  • What data does your organization collect about how your organization learns? This could be information that would help respond to the items above, or other information about effectiveness and relevance of organizational learning you might collect. Note that we are not looking for the specific information about what you are learning but are more interested in what types of information you gather and how:


Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statements about resource mobilization within your organization.

  • Our organization proactively looks for in-kind resources our members or partners can provide us (e.g. facility space, equipment, expertise).
  • Most people in our organization believe it’s important for us to find sources of financial support outside of the Wikimedia Foundation.
  • Our organization knows about, and uses, all of the in-kind resources (e.g. facility space, equipment, expertise) available to us through our members and partners.
  • Raising resources (financial or in-kind) is critical for our organization to sustain its work.
  • Our organization raises financial resources from multiple sources (e.g. from grants, fundraising, website donations, fee-for-service work).
  • Access to expertise and other resources: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in managing software development or technology work.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: We consult regularly with key stakeholders (technology volunteers, online contributors) to ensure our software development or technology work is relevant, and is not interfering with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization’s software development or technology work will lead to significant impact for the mission on a global scale.
  • Our organization is an effective steward of grant funds (if applicable).

What data does your organization collect about how your resource mobilization? This could be information that would help respond to the items above, or other information about your ability to mobilize financial and in-kind resources that you might collect. Note that we are not looking for the specific information about what you are learning but are more interested in what types of information you gather and how:

Section 3: Other Organization Strategies[edit]

This section contains questions about strategies that some organizations will use, but not others. These include program strategies: (A) Supporting contributors by providing resources; (B) Software and technology; (C) Advocacy work; (D) Online contests; (E) Edit-a-thons, workshops, trainings; and (F) Partnerships, including GLAM and education. This section also includes strategies related to organization processes: (G) Governance, (H) Finances, and (I) Planning. Please answer each question, to the best of your knowledge.

Is your organization involved in supporting online contributors (for example, through grants, meeting spaces, and equipment)?

  • Yes
  • No (Skip to question 17

Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statements about your organization’s programs to support online contributors by providing resources like grants, meeting spaces, and equipment.

  • Community support: Our organization understands the needs of contributors and volunteers. and provides resources based on these needs.
  • Grants and reimbursements: Our organization provides grants, reimbursements, or travel scholarships to online contributors and volunteers.
    • IF YES Grants and reimbursements: Our organization provides clear information about how to apply for and receive grants, reimbursements or travel scholarships, in our local languages.
    • IF YES Grants and reimbursements: Our organization tracks the results of grants, reimbursements and travel scholarships to understand their impact on the Wikimedia sites.
    • IF YES Grants and reimbursements: Our grants, reimbursements, and travel scholarships lead to online impact.
  • Equipment: Our organization provides equipment (such as books, photography equipment, or digitization equipment) to volunteers and contributors.
    • IF YES Equipment: Our organization provides clear information about how to borrow or receive equipment, in our local languages.
    • IF YES Equipment Our organization tracks the results of activities performed with the equipment to understand their impact on the Wikimedia sites.
    • IF YES Equipment: Our equipment for volunteers and contributors leads to online impact.
  • Meeting space: Our organization provides places for volunteers and contributors to gather (by directly renting or owning a space, or by facilitating in-kind donations of space).
    • IF YES Meeting space: Our organization tracks how volunteers use meeting spaces provided or supported by our organization.
    • IF YESMeeting space: Providing places for volunteers to gather leads to online impact.
  • Community support: We have the resources we need to (time, space, funding, supplies) to effectively do programs that support online contributors.
  • Community support: The resources (time, money, in-kind support) our organization uses to support online contributors and volunteers (through grants, equipment lending, online support, events, and meeting spaces) corresponds to the impact of this work on the Wikimedia sites.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in managing software development or technology work.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: We consult regularly with key stakeholders (technology volunteers, online contributors) to ensure our software development or technology work is relevant, and is not interfering with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization’s software development or technology work will lead to significant impact for the mission on a global scale.
  • What data does your organization collect regarding volunteer and community support? This could be information about grants and scholarships, equipment, resources for events or meeting space or other information you might collect. Note that we are not looking for a list of data, but are more interested in what types of information you gather and how:


Does your organization do work to develop software or tools for use on the Wikimedia projects, or toward the Wikimedia mission? Answer yes to this question if you work specifically to develop software or tools. (Other types of technology-related support for tech-focused volunteers or technology equipment lending programs are covered in other sections of the Questionnaire.)

  • Yes
  • No (Skip to question 19)
  • Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statements about your organization’s software development or technology work.
  • Relevance to organizational mission: Software development or technology work is core to our organization’s mission.
  • Planning process: We have clear goals and milestones for our software development or technology work, and staff and volunteers engaged with our work agree on these goals and milestones.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization’s software development or technology work addresses an important gap that is not addressed by other movement organizations.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: We consult regularly with key stakeholders (technology volunteers, online contributors) to ensure our software development or technology work is relevant, and is not interfering with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization has done effective software development or technology work in the past.
  • Planning process : Our organization has systems in place to monitor and manage software development or technology work while it is in progress.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization plans for and understands how its software development or technology work is related to and dependent upon other work happening in the movement, and communicates effectively with other movement organizations (including WMF) about these dependencies.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: Our organization has the resources (volunteers, staff, money, tools) to do effective software development or technology work.
  • Partnerships to expand software development or technology: Our organization is collaborating with other organizations in the movement (including WMF) on this software development or technology work to raise funds for this work.
  • Partnerships to expand software development or technology: Our organization is collaborating with other organizations in the movement (including WMF) on this software development or technology work to share resources other than money (e.g. people, expertise, time) for this work.
  • Partnerships to expand software development or technology: Our organization is collaborating with external organizations on this software development or technology work to raise funds for this work.
  • Partnerships to expand software development or technology: Our organization is collaborating with organizations outside of the Wikimedia movement on this software development or technology work to share resources (money, people, time).
  • Value add of technology and software development: The impact we achieve through software development or technology work justifies the resources we use.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in managing software development or technology work.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: We consult regularly with key stakeholders (technology volunteers, online contributors) to ensure our software development or technology work is relevant, and is not interfering with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization’s software development or technology work will lead to significant impact for the mission on a global scale.
  • What data does your organization collect regarding software and technology tools? Note that we are not looking for a list of data, but are more interested in what types of information you gather and how:


Is your organization involved in advocacy work or outreach to policymakers (for example, working toward changing education policies or laws that affect issues like copyright reform)?

  • Yes
  • No (Skip to question 22)

Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statements about your organization’s engagement in advocacy work (for example, working toward changing policies or laws that affect issues like copyright reform). Local policy & advocacy work: Our organization informs the public about where policymakers stand on issues that may affect the Wikimedia movement or the open knowledge movement more broadly. Local policy & advocacy work: Our organization communicates directly with influencial policymakers about relevant issues (for example, open knowledge or content liberation).

  • Local policy & advocacy work: Our organization keeps stakeholders informed about policies in our country that could affect the Wikimedia movement.
  • Local policy & advocacy work: Our organization partners with other organizations that engage in direct lobbying of policymakers.
  • Global policy & advocacy work: Our organization is active in international advocacy efforts (for example working on open knowledge or content liberation cross-nationally).
  • General views on policy and advocacy work: Our organization has influenced policies relevant to the Wikimedia movement or the broader open knowledge movement.
  • General views on policy and advocacy work: Changing laws and policies is an important way that our organization can achieve impact.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in managing software development or technology work.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: We consult regularly with key stakeholders (technology volunteers, online contributors) to ensure our software development or technology work is relevant, and is not interfering with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization’s software development or technology work will lead to significant impact for the mission on a global scale.
  • What data does your organization collect about its advocacy activities? This could be information related to the items above, or other information about advocacy and policy work you might collect. Note that we are not looking for the specific information about your advocacy work but are more interested in what types of information you gather and how:


Is your organization involved in organizing online contests?

  • Yes
  • No (Skip to question 25)

Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statements about your organization’s contests to encourage contributors to add or improve content on the Wikimedia projects. Online contests: We understand how online contests can lead to online impact.

  • Online contests: Our online contests bring in new contributors to Wikimedia projects, who continue to contribute after the contests.
  • Online contests: We track how participants in our online contests remain engaged with Wikimedia work after the competition ends (for example, do new contributors continue editing after 6 months).
  • Online contests: Our online contests result in significant amounts of quality content added to the Wikimedia projects.
  • Online contests: We track content added to Wikimedia projects through online contests to understand how contests improve the Wikimedia projects.
  • Online contests: We have written rules for how online contests will work.
  • Online contests: We have a method for deciding what the topic and structure of online contests will be, which is based on the outcomes we want to achieve.
  • Online contests: We share information about online contests in different ways, to draw in the right participants (for example village pumps, mailing lists, websites, social media, other organizations).
  • Resources: The resources we use (time, money, stuff, expertise) to do online contests results in enough impact to justify the expense.
  • What data does your organization collect on the effectiveness of your organization’s contests? This could be information that would help respond to the items above, or other information about contests you might collect. Note that we are not looking for the specific information about your contests but are more interested in what types of information you gather and how:
  • Access to expertise and other resources: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in managing software development or technology work.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: We consult regularly with key stakeholders (technology volunteers, online contributors) to ensure our software development or technology work is relevant, and is not interfering with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization’s software development or technology work will lead to significant impact for the mission on a global scale.

Does your organization organize events to introduce new people to Wikimedia or to engage people who are already contributing? (For example, outreach events or workshops for people who are new to Wikimedia, workshops or trainings for current contributors, or edit-a-thons aimed at current contributors.)

  • Yes.
  • No (Skip to question 28)

Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statements about your organization’s events. We are including three types of events in this section: edit-a-thons, workshops / trainings, and outreach events. Edit-a-thons are aimed at current contributors, and they have a goal of creating content. Workshops / trainings may be aimed at new contributors or current contributors, and they have the goal of teaching people how to contribute to the Wikimedia sites. Outreach events are aimed at new contributors, but do not necessarily teach people how to contribute to the Wikimedia sites. An example might be a lecture about Wikimedia delivered to a wider audience.

  • Workshops / trainings: Our workshops / trainings always have a clear purpose that is shared with participants before the workshop.
  • Workshops / trainings: Our workshops / trainings are attended by people with the right level of knowledge to learn the material and effectively engage with our projects.
  • Workshops / trainings: There is measurable improvement in participant skills or motivations after attending workshops / trainings.
  • Workshops / trainings: We track...
  • Workshops / trainings: Particiapnts in our workshops / trainings engage with relevant Wikimedia work after they attend workshops / trainings.
  • Workshops / trainings: We track how participants in trainings and workshops are engaged with relevant Wikimedia work over time after they attend workshops / trainings.

*Workshops / trainings: We have train-the-trainer workshops (for example, workshops where volunteers and service providers are taught how to train others).

  • Events strategies: We hold events that are part of a series in order to engage participants over a longer period of time.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in managing software development or technology work.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: We consult regularly with key stakeholders (technology volunteers, online contributors) to ensure our software development or technology work is relevant, and is not interfering with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization’s software development or technology work will lead to significant impact for the mission on a global scale.
  • What data does your organization collect on the effectiveness of your organization’s events (workshops, edit-a-thons, trainings, outreach events)? This could be information that would help respond to the items above, or other information about events you might collect. Note that we are not looking for the specific information about your events but are more interested in what types of information you gather and how:


  • Edit-a-thons: Our edit-a-thons always have clear goals.
  • Edit-a-thons: The goals of our edit-a-thons are defined in collaboration with participants.
  • Edit-a-thons: We track the results of our edit-a-thons, including collecting the usernames of participants and categorizing any content created or improved.
  • Edit-a-thons: After an edit-a-thon, there are measurable differences in the quality of the online projects we are targeting (for example, improved articles on Wikipedia).
  • Edit-a-thons: We recognize the positive contributions and participation of attendees of edit-a-thons.
  • Edit-a-thons: We see evidence that our edit-a-thons encourage community building.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in managing software development or technology work.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: We consult regularly with key stakeholders (technology volunteers, online contributors) to ensure our software development or technology work is relevant, and is not interfering with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization’s software development or technology work will lead to significant impact for the mission on a global scale.
  • What data does your organization collect on the effectiveness of your organization’s events (workshops, edit-a-thons, trainings, outreach events)? This could be information that would help respond to the items above, or other information about events you might collect. Note that we are not looking for the specific information about your events but are more interested in what types of information you gather and how:


  • Outreach events: Our outreach events for new people have clear goals.
  • We have systems in place to know if we are meeting the goals of our outreach events.
  • Outreach events: Our outreach events target people who engage in Wikimedia activities (online or offline) in the future.
  • Our outreach events reach people who will contribute to the diversity of our projects.
  • Outreach events: As a result of our outreach events for new people, we know that more people engage in Wikimedia activities (for example, volunteering, editing, donating).
  • We measure whether people engage in Wikimedia activities as a result of our outreach events.
  • Outreach events: We have information on our website, in our local language, that clearly explains what Wikipedia and Wikimedia are.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in managing software development or technology work.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: We consult regularly with key stakeholders (technology volunteers, online contributors) to ensure our software development or technology work is relevant, and is not interfering with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization’s software development or technology work will lead to significant impact for the mission on a global scale.
  • What data does your organization collect on the effectiveness of your organization’s events (workshops, edit-a-thons, trainings, outreach events)? This could be information that would help respond to the items above, or other information about events you might collect. Note that we are not looking for the specific information about your events but are more interested in what types of information you gather and how:


Does your organization partner with other organizations to increase content contributions to the Wikimedia projects? (For example, partnerships with GLAMS or other cultural institutions, education programs, work with other Wikimedia organizations.)

  • Yes
  • No (Skip to question 31)

Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statements about your organization’s partnerships (for example, your partnerships with GLAMs, governments, other non-government organizations / non-profit organizations, and education programs). *Types of partnerships: Our organization partners with cultural organizations like galleries, libraries, archives, or museums.

  • Types of partnerships: Our organization has placed a Wikipedian-in-Residence at a partner organization.
  • Types of partnerships: Our organization partners with or collaborates with other Wikimedia organizations.
  • Types of partnerships: Our organization partners with other open-knowledge focused organizations (for example Mozilla, Open Knowledge Foundation).
  • Types of partnerships: Our organization partners with organizations or nonprofits from outside of the GLAM or open-knowledge movement (e.g. the business community, nonprofits working with youth, or others sorts of organizations).
  • Types of partnerships: Our organization partners with universities or secondary schools, or with other educational partners (for example, to use Wikipedia in the classroom).
  • Our partners see clear value in our work together.
  • Our partners contribute resources (money, staff time, in kind donations) to Wikimedia work.
  • We effectively prioritize which partnerships to develop.
  • Our partnerships result in high quality content added to the Wikimedia projects.
  • Our partnerships result in content added to the Wikimedia projects that is frequently used.
  • Our partnerships results in large amounts of content added to the WIkimedia projects.
  • Our organization tracks how content generated through partnerships is used.
  • Our organization tracks partner contributions over time, even after a formal partnership has ended.
  • We are sometimes approached by organizations that are eager to partner with us.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in managing software development or technology work.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: We consult regularly with key stakeholders (technology volunteers, online contributors) to ensure our software development or technology work is relevant, and is not interfering with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization’s software development or technology work will lead to significant impact for the mission on a global scale.
  • What data does your organization collect about the way your organization works with organizational partners? This could be information that would help respond to the items above, or other information about partnerships you might collect. Note that we are not looking for the specific information about your work with partners but are more interested in what types of information you gather and how:


Does your organization have a governing body (for example a board of directors)?

  • Yes
  • No (Skip to question 34)

Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statements about your organization’s governance.

  • Everyone involved with our group or organization understands who is responsible for making decisions.
  • Key stakeholders outside of our board and leadership are engaged with our organization's decision-making processes, and have influence.
  • We regularly publish minutes from our board or leadership meetings.
  • Roles and responsibilities among our board, governing council, or leadership are documented.
  • Some people in our group or organization have too much power.
  • Governance: Members of our group or organization’s board or leadership body have useful and relevant perspectives on Wikimedia and the open knowledge movement, and/or relevant expertise in programs or organizations.

*Governance: Our organization’s board or decision-making body delegates some tasks to subgroups or committees.

  • Governance: Our organization’s board or decision-making body understands its role in leading the organization, whether it is a governance board (a volunteer board dedicated to understanding the big picture while staff or key volunteers do the work on the ground) or a working board (a volunteer board that also does the programmatic and operational work of the organization themselves).
  • Governance: Our organization’s board or decision-making body has clearly defined the legal and ethical standards under which our organization must operate (for example, a conflict of interest policy), and ensures that people in our organization meet these standards.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in managing software development or technology work.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: We consult regularly with key stakeholders (technology volunteers, online contributors) to ensure our software development or technology work is relevant, and is not interfering with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization’s software development or technology work will lead to significant impact for the mission on a global scale.
  • Does your organization’s board or decision-making body have systems in place or policies on evaluating its own work and performance? If so, please describe them here:


Does your organization engage in planning or prioritization (this could be an annual plan or strategic plan, for example, or a list of priority projects)?

  • Yes
  • No (Skip to question 36)

Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statements about your organization’s planning and prioritization.


  • Annual plan: Our organization makes a public plan each year that describes our priorities and goals for 12 months.

IF YES:

  • Annual plan: Our organization evaluates our progress on our annual priorities at least every 3 months, and adjusts our quarterly activities to meet our annual goals as needed.
  • Annual plan: Most volunteers in our organization (beyond the board or leadership) know the specific priorities and goals we are focusing on in the current annual plan.
  • Annual plan: We consult many volunteers (beyond the board or leadership) and many contributors when making our annual plan.
  • Expertise: We consult many volunteers (beyond the board or leadership) and many contributors when making our annual plans, to ensure this work will be relevant and useful and will not interfere with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Expertise: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in annual planning.
  • Strategic plan: Our organization has identified and documented what we will prioritize over the next few years, to achieve our high level goals.

IF YES:

  • Strategic plan: Our organization's annual plan each year is closely related to our organization's documented strategy.
  • Strategic plan: Our organization evaluates our progress toward our strategy at least every 12 months, and adjusts our annual plans to meet our long term goals as needed.
  • Strategic plan: Most volunteers in our organization (beyond the board or leadership) and most contributors know our organization's long term goals.
  • Strategic plan:
  • Expertise: We consult many volunteers (beyond the board or leadership) and many contributors when making our strategic plans, to ensure this work will be relevant and useful and will not interfere with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Expertise: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in strategic planning.

IF NO TO GROUPS 1 AND 2:

  • Project plans: Our organization involves volunteers (beyond the board or leadership) and contributors in our project planning.
  • Project plans: Our organization makes clear plans for each project that include roles assigned, timelines, and clear targets.
  • Project plans: Our organization has a systematic way of determining which projects should be prioritized and pursued.

ALL:

  • Impact: Our work on planning and prioritization will lead to significant impact for the mission on a global scale.

Does your organization manage any resources or funds?

  • Yes
  • No (Skip to question 38)

Please indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with the following statements about your organization’s resources and/or finances.

  • Financial management: Everyone in our organization knows who in our organization is responsible for managing finances.
  • Financial management: Our organization is aware of, and complies with, local laws, regulations, and local best practices for funds management for an organization or group of our type, including external review where recommended.
  • Financial management: Our organization has clear internal policies in place about how organization funds can and cannot be used.
  • At least two people in our organization need to approve every transaction.
  • Our organization has a dedicated bank account, with adequate controls including at least 2 people with access to the account.
  • Budgeting and reporting: Our organization produces an annual financial report each year, and shares it publicly within 4 months of the end of the fiscal year.
  • Budgeting and reporting: Our organization plans an annual budget for each coming year, and shares it publicly before the fiscal year begins.
  • Budgeting and reporting: In general, our organization spends what we planned (not significantly more or less).

*Financial resources: Our organization is able to raise the resources we need (including funds and in-kind donations) to be effective.

  • Financial resources: Our organization and its activities are supported by in-kind resources.
  • Financial resources: Our organization keeps a record of who is donating directly to the organization.
  • Financial resources: Our organization receives more than 75% of its funding from a single donor or funding source.
  • Impact investment: The amount of money our organization spends on its programs and activities is low with respect to the impact we achieve.
  • Financial management: Our organization is effective at ensuring that resources go where they can achieve the most impact.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: Our organization has at least one active board member or executive-level staff person with significant expertise in managing software development or technology work.
  • Access to expertise and other resources: We consult regularly with key stakeholders (technology volunteers, online contributors) to ensure our software development or technology work is relevant, and is not interfering with work on the Wikimedia projects.
  • Value add of technology and software development: Our organization’s software development or technology work will lead to significant impact for the mission on a global scale.

Are there other significant strategies your organization uses to achieve impact toward your organization’s mission?

  • Yes
  • No (Skip to question 40)

Please describe any other significant strategies for effectiveness your organization uses.

Please let us know if you have any feedback or comments on this Questionnaire, and whether/how it can be improved.

In the section below, please let us know if there is any additional information that you would like to share with us that we did not ask about. This information can be about other core competencies your organization has, other strategies used by your organization, or other descriptions of your work that you think is important to capture.