Talk:Wikilore

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No refs required?[edit]

A nice idea, but how do you ensure that it remains a non-fiction collection?· · · Peter (Southwood) (talk): 05:08, 18 January 2016 (UTC)

The oral citation methods, audio or video interview with personal source can be used as reference for this purpose --Adv.tksujith (talk) 16:07, 18 January 2016 (UTC)
That is a reference. The specification stated that references would not be required. · · · Peter (Southwood) (talk): 16:39, 18 January 2016 (UTC)
Oral citations seem like a nice idea. I know about it from an article about an Indian sport named Gilli Danda.--Satdeep Gill (talk) 17:59, 18 January 2016 (UTC)

See the old Oral Citations project[edit]

Neat idea, and please do look at the old Research:Oral_Citations and reach out to its project leader @Aprabhala: -- Fuzheado (talk) 16:15, 18 January 2016 (UTC)

@Fuzheado: Thanks a lot. I have seen this project earlier and we can surely incorporate this.--Satdeep Gill (talk) 18:10, 18 January 2016 (UTC)

potential of Wikilore[edit]

This is by someone I know its a firsthand account of fighting a major fire which damaged or destroyed 109 houses, to me this is what Wikilore could collect. As yet this piece of knowledge, those first hand accounts are not able to be collected they not able to be part of the story yet its vital component in the sum of all knowledge. Admittedly there are challenges in authentication, with differing needs dependent on whats being told but we have here is project that can add another piece to the puzzle. Gnangarra (talk) 10:09, 6 February 2016 (UTC)

Five years ago today we fought the biggest battle of our lives and although we managed to save our lives and our home we did not come out unscathed. For me personally, it took years to regain a balance in my life and still to this day there are times where I lose it. Facing a wall of fire is not for the faint hearted. But having to watch your loved ones literally stand their ground between the house and the fire front only 2 metres away, silhouetted, and looking like charcoaled figures against the flames is a living nightmare. One that printed itself on my mind for years. I would catch my breath every time I saw them wondering if these charcoaled images would become charcoal remains. As shocking as it was I had to walk away from them. I had to do what I could to keep them safe. While they were fighting a wall of flames often higher than our two storey house, (with its flames licking the roof). It was like an evil devil monster. And yes, it did personify itself in this way. It became a war between it and us.

The fire was coming at us from three sides at once. (Something you don't really anticipate). The boys were situated on the main fire front but we still had to manage the other fires to prevent being engulfed. My job was to man the areas in their blind spots. Luckily for me they were not as intense, but bad enough for this feeble spirit. The light is blocked out by the smoke and everything becomes dark. And in that darkness embers rain down like a meteor shower. Trees and bushes explode around in a cacophony of sounds coming from helitacs, sirens, urgent voices and most of all the many voices of the fire itself crackling, whooshing and banging. And amongst this, you just keep going because if you don't all is lost. You just keep taking deep breathes and forestalling all the thoughts and fears that keep popping into you head because you know you have to be in the moment you have to stay clear headed. You have to slow down the pace of your thoughts in order to make good decisions. All the while we watched in horror as houses burnt down around us. The entire hill on the opposite side and behind us was engulfed in flames. Even though I was seeing it, it was unimaginable. It became surreal and in that way I could handle it. The helitacs just kept coming, dropping their fire retardant. It was a wonderful feeling as it dropped. It is strange, even then, as the foam bounced off hard paving it gave me some childish delight. I was exhilarated when my clothes were drenched and body cooled. It was a glorious feeling. But most of all the joy of seeing the flames abate if only for a moment before they leapt back in vengeance for another bout. The only good thing about fire is that eventually they burn themselves out and somehow we managed to hold on until that point. How we did it I will never know. I still cannot believe that we saved our house when the fire was literally upon us. It could not have been closer or fiercer. And now its five years on... You can't live through something like that without it leaving some scars. I couldn't sleep at night. The sound of the wind made me jumpy, I couldn't go swimming as the underwater sounds seem to bring things back as if I was there. I was frightened to leave the house and so it went on. Simply I just forgot how to function. Without my two personal heroes, xxxx and yyyy we would never had made it. And although we were essentially on our own the helitacs and the firie who stood by us as he directed the drops were amazing. He told us that they were so stretched they has to choose which houses to save and which to let burn and for them it was absolutely devastating. They were heroes that night and heroes everyday because they are prepared to keep facing these horrors for us.

I also have to thank my neighbours who stayed and fought also. Without them I would never have got though. They understood the horrors and the circumstances that we were all in. They witnessed our fight and talked about it, which was important. Sometimes you think you are delusional but when they described their fear on witnessing our fight, they wept, I wept. Not because of remembering but because it was acknowledged by someone there. It kind of justifies my feelings. Because no one will ever know who has not been through it just how it is. We held each others hands for a few years and shed many tears and laughter together. I really appreciated it. T
  • @Gnangarra: I thought this was about folklore. If you're talking about interviews, you should first learn about Wikinews. --Pi zero (talk) 19:00, 6 February 2016 (UTC).
    • its not Wikinews topic, I've written many an article there already Wikinews is a current news project not a history project. What I said is that it can be more than just folklore it can hold firsthand accounts as well. "Folklore" is just one component of oral history Gnangarra (talk) 01:15, 7 February 2016 (UTC)
  • @Gnangarra: I see you've written synthesis articles on en.wn. But interviews are different from synthesis. An interview potentially is its own focal event, so that interviews can in fact cover a good deal more than just "current events". When I say you should learn about Wikinews, I mean learning both what can be done with interviews, and how Wikinews handles authentication. --Pi zero (talk) 01:44, 7 February 2016 (UTC)