Sondaggio 2016 dei desideri della comunità

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This page is a translated version of the page Community Wishlist Survey 2016 and the translation is 50% complete.

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Magic Wand Icon 229981 Color Flipped.svg The 2016 Community Wishlist Survey is over... Magic Wand Icon 229981 Color Flipped.svg

Here are the Community Wishlist Survey 2016 results

Grazie per la tua partecipazione!

Total: 265 proposals, 1132 contributors, 5037 support votes

Curious about what happens next? Check out the Community Wishlist Survey 2016 FAQ.

Categorie
Fai clic su una categoria per vedere le proposte

Amministratori e gestori
9 proposals
Bot e gadget
13 proposals
Citazioni
6 proposals
Commons
21 proposals
Modifiche
34 proposals
Varie
34 proposals
Cellulare e applicazioni
10 proposals
Strumenti di moderazione
13 proposals
Multimedia
23 proposals
Programmi ed eventi
7 proposals
Lettura
10 proposals
Ricerca
11 proposals
Osservati speciali
24 proposals
Wikidata
26 proposals
WikiProjects
2 proposals
Wikisource
18 proposals
Wikizionario
4 proposals

 

Programmazione
  • Invio, discussione e revisione delle proposte: Nov. 7–20, 2016
  • Community Tech reviews and organizes proposals: Nov. 21–27
  • Votazione delle proposte: Nov. 28–Dec. 12

Analisi dell'inchiesta: Dic. 13-14

  • Pubblicazione dei risultati: 15 dicembre
  • Analisi e valutazione dei desideri principali da parte del Community Tech team: fine dicembre

Presentazione della valutazione iniziale: inizio gennaio 2017

  • Lavoro sui desideri: gennaio - dicembre 2017!

 

The Community Tech team is a Wikimedia Foundation team focused on the needs of active Wikimedia contributors for improved curation and moderation tools. The projects that we primarily work on are decided by the Wikimedia community, through the annual Community Wishlist Survey.

Una volta all'anno i collaboratori attivi di Wikimedia possono inviare proposte per funzionalità o correzioni su cui vorrebbero che il nostro team lavorasse. Dopo due settimane, puoi votare le idee che più ti interessano. Le dieci più votate saranno studiate e gestite dalla Community Tech. Alcune tre le altre migliori proposte potranno essere gestite da altri gruppi di sviluppo.

This survey process was developed by Wikimedia Deutschland's Technical Wishes team, who run a wishlist survey on German Wikipedia. The international wishlist process is supported by the Community Relations team.

 

How many wishes were addressed from the last survey?

Un bel po'! Eccone una breve lista.

  • Wish #1: Migrate dead external links to archives—Community Tech supported a volunteer-run project on English Wikipedia, writing and testing code that helps InternetArchiveBot to detect dead links.
  • Wish #2: Improved diff comparisons—The nightmare diff in the proposal was a small change made in a huge paragraph, which highlighted the paragraph and obscured the change. A WMF developer updated the diff engine; now it shows what actually changed.
  • Wish #5: Numerical sorting in categories—Community Tech implemented support for numerical sorting and has deployed the feature to 18 different wikis so far; we're currently offering the feature to any wikis that want to try it.
  • Necessità #7: Utensile di statistiche di pagine vesta - La Community Tech creò l'utensile di analisi di pagine consultate, che adesso sta in uso in tutte le Wikipedias.
  • Wish #9: Improve the plagiarism detection bot—Community Tech built CopyPatrol, a new interface for the plagiarism detection workflow that's attracted more patrollers, and eliminated the backlog of cases.

Community Tech is currently working on wish #4, Cross-wiki watchlist, and there are more wishes that have been addressed by volunteers and other teams.

Alcuni dei 10 desideri più votati non sono stati realizzabili per vari motivi; è possibile vedere tutti i desideri sulla pagina dei risultati del sondaggio, con i collegamenti alle pagine di progetto e alle discussioni.

 

La mascotte del Community Tech: un cane con indosso un cappello di Babbo Natale.

The proposal phase is the first two weeks of the survey.

In the proposal phase, contributors from every project and language can submit proposals for features and fixes that you'd like to see in 2016. Proposals may be submitted in any language. If you submit a proposal in a language other than English, we will attempt to get it translated so everyone can read and vote on it more easily.

Proposals should be discrete, well-defined tasks that will directly benefit active Wikimedia contributors. Proposals should answer the following questions:

  • What is the problem that you want to solve?
  • Which users are affected? (editors, admins, Commons users, Wikipedia users, etc.)
  • How is this problem being addressed now?
  • What are the proposed solutions? (if there are any ideas)

Your proposal should be as specific as possible, especially in the problem statement. Don't just say that "(x feature) is out of date", "needs to be improved" or "has a lot of bugs". That's not enough information to figure out what needs to be done. A good proposal explains exactly what the problem is, and who's affected by it. It's okay if you don't have a specific solution to propose, or if you have a few possible solutions and you don't know which is best.

Submitting a proposal is just the beginning of the process. The two-week proposal phase is a time that the community can collaboratively work on a proposal that presents the idea in a way that's most likely to succeed in the voting phase. When a proposal is submitted, everyone is invited to comment on that proposal, and help to make it better — asking questions, and suggesting changes. Similar proposals can be combined; very broad proposals should be split up into more specific ideas. The goal is to create the best possible proposal for the voting phase.

The person who submits a proposal should expect to be active in that discussion, and help to make changes along the way. Because of that, we're going to limit proposals to three per account. If you post more than three proposals, we'll ask you to narrow it down to three. Bring your best ideas!

Similarly, only registered users can make proposals to ensure they can watchlist the discussion and respond to questions. Just as with voting, you should be an active editor on at least one Wikimedia project. If you do not meet this criteria, or you have hit your proposal limit but have more ideas, you can seek other users to adopt your proposals.

One more note: Proposals that call for removing or disabling a feature that a WMF product team has worked on are outside of Community Tech's possible scope. They won't be in the voting phase.

 

Yes, you may submit some proposals that didn't get enough support votes in past years, and deserve a second try.

If you decide to copy a proposal from the old survey into the new survey, we expect you to "adopt" that proposal — meaning that you'll be actively participating in the discussion about that idea, and willing to make changes to the proposal in order to make it a stronger idea when it moves to the voting phase. As we said above, there's a limit of three proposals per person, and posting a proposal from last year counts.

It's helpful if you want to post a link to the previous discussion, but please don't copy over the votes and discussion from last year. If there are good points that people made in last year's discussions, include the suggestions or caveats in the new proposal.

 

Aldino per Natale.jpg

After the proposal phase, we take a break to review the proposals before the voting phase begins.

All active contributors can review and vote for the proposals that they want to support. You can vote for as many different proposals as you want. To ensure fair voting, only registered users can vote, and votes by very new accounts may be removed.

The only votes that are counted are Support votes. The final list of wishes will be ranked in order of the most Support votes. If you are the proposer, a support vote is automatically counted for your proposal.

However, lively discussion is encouraged during the voting phase. If you want to post an Oppose or Neutral vote with a comment, then feel free to do so. These discussions can help people to make up their mind about whether they want to vote for the proposals. The discussions also provide useful input to guide the work that will happen through the year.

A reasonable amount of canvassing is acceptable. You've got an opportunity to sell your idea to as many people as you can reach. Feel free to reach out to other people in your project, WikiProject or user group. Obviously, this shouldn't involve sockpuppets, or badgering people to vote or to change their vote. But a good-faith "get out the vote" campaign is absolutely okay.

Note also that the proposals are occasionally rotated to ensure all get fair visibility. This is done by simply moving the top proposal to the bottom.

 

It's common that most of the proposals that end up in the top 10 are for the biggest projects — the big Wikipedias, and Commons. There are many smaller groups and projects that don't have enough "voting power" to boost their proposal into the top 10, but are doing important work for our movement.

Our team has a commitment to work on projects that help out smaller groups, including campaign and program organizers, GLAM participants, smaller projects like Wikisource and Wiktionary, and stewards and CheckUsers.

Having smaller projects' proposals in the Wishlist Survey is important — it helps our team and the Wikimedia Foundation broadly know what people in smaller groups need. So yes, please come and post your proposals, even if you don't think you'll get into the top 10!

 

The Support-vote rankings create a prioritized backlog of wishes, and the Community Tech team is responsible for evaluating and addressing the top 10 wishes. To do that, we investigate all of the top wishes, and look at both the technical and social/policy risk factors.

The Oppose and Neutral votes are very helpful in raising potential downsides. For controversial wishes, we balance the voting with a more consensus-based review. As an example, this worked in the 2015 survey: The wish to "add a user watchlist" received a lot of votes but also some heartfelt Oppose votes. We listened to all sides, and made a decision on whether to pursue the project or not.

 

Ogni cane che indossa un cappello di Babbo Natale lavora per la Community Tech.

…instead of addressing every item below the top 10 from last year's survey?

The main reason why we're making the survey an annual event is that we want to include more people! More people know about the team and the survey now, and after a year where many of the top wishes were completed, we're expecting that people will be even more interested and excited about participating. We want to give everyone a chance to bring new ideas.

If there are wishes from last year's survey that you think deserve another shot, see “[[#resubmit|Translations:Community Wishlist Survey/section-resubmit/56/it]]” above.