維持活動安全

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This page is a translated version of the page Keeping events safe and the translation is 22% complete.

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《維持活動安全》的手冊為PDF格式。其封面是2014年國際維基年會的志工正在自拍的側拍照。
這份文件也有可下載的PDF格式檔案。

本資源工具是份短小、容易取得的精華手冊,描述當你在組織一個活動的時候可能會有幫助的一些最佳實務。這本手冊並無意建立標準規範,而是在處理活動的安全議題時提供相關建議和指引。

友善空間方針

友善空間方針是在活動進行時由活動籌辦者所執行的一種方針。它立下一系列的指引,活動參與者必須遵守,進而能夠讓活動不發生騷擾之行為。

就如同其他維基活動中不應發生的不得體行為,此方針通常是禁止參與者騷擾他人。在方針中有明定出騷擾的定義、以及如果有人在維基活動裡頭違反方針的話應該採取的步驟。對於科技的相關空間與活關,技術界行為準則也一並適用。

適用於維基活動的友善空間方針可以在元維基上獲取。團體可以直接使用,或進行修改。但每次友善空間方針之最終定稿,應該都要跟其他的活動參與者分享。

為何需要友善空間方針?

維基媒體運動的核心原則之一是「開放與包容」。只有在運動的一份子感到參與其中是安全的時候才能夠達成上述原則。友善空間政策是設計來明確的定義什麼構成了不適當行為,進而讓活動組織者得以採取行動來避免或阻止讓其他人感到不安全或不受歡迎的行為。

本方針對於騷擾的定義為何?

Harassment includes but is not limited to offensive verbal comments related to gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability, physical appearance, age, race, ethnicity, political affiliation, national origin, or religion. Harassment also includes sexual images in public spaces, deliberate intimidation, stalking, unwelcome following, harassing photography or recording, sustained disruption of events, inappropriate physical contact, and unwelcome sexual attention.

Who should violations be reported to?

If an attendee witnesses something they believe goes against the Friendly Space Policy, there are a few courses of action they might take. These are covered in detail in the “Taking action” section of this kit. This information should be clearly explained to attendees when they arrive (for example, in the opening presentation and on posters around the venue).

If attendees feel safe doing so, telling a person to stop the behavior immediately can be the best action in non-violent situations.

活動安全的準備工作

This page supplies a checklist to prepare your event safety procedures. This list can't cover everything—it covers only the essentials.

活動準備期間

  • Publish the event's Friendly Space Policy on the event webpage before the event begins. Link to it in all event communications, such as during the online registration process.
    • It is a good idea to print posters summarizing the policy and to display them around the venue.

活動開始之前

  • Designate at least two people to respond to Friendly Space violations. The points of contact must know how to contact local emergency services, Wikimedia Foundation officials, or other authorities as necessary. Brief them on the guidelines. For small events, this may need to be you.
  • Make sure those designated to respond to incidents are easy to recognize, for example through special badges or shirts, so that they can be easily located.
  • Collect important contact numbers such as local medical services, hotels, and taxi companies. Publicize them as needed at the event.
  • Check in with the event venue so that you know their onsite team and security procedures and so that they know your plans.
  • Be prepared to explain why the Friendly Space Policy (and, if applicable, the Code of Conduct) is important.

活動期間

  • During the opening of the event, remind participants of the Friendly Space Policy and their commitment to adhere to the policy. Point out the event organizers who will respond to Friendly Space complaints, as well as any relevant posters or wiki pages.

Dealing with an incident

This is a checklist for steps to take if someone brings an incident to your attention. This is meant as a guide—feel free to adapt it to your needs.

第一反應

  • If there is a threat to safety, call security or police immediately.
  • Help the person making the report feel safe. Find a comfortable, quiet, and at least semi-private place to speak with them.
    • Ask the person if they would like a friend or trusted colleague present during your conversation.
  • Listen actively. Follow the advice in the “Taking the Report” section for best practices in speaking with those involved.
  • Take notes. This provides a record for future actions should they be taken. Important things to record include:
    • Time and place of the incident(s)
    • Names of people immediately affected
    • Names of potential witnesses
    • Details of what happened

Consult with the person making the report on actions they would like taken. Be cautious about making promises before you finish your review of the situation.

After the report is taken

  • Determine what action needs to be taken, and inform the reporter what you are doing. (See the “Taking Action” section for more information on how to do this.)
  • Follow up. See “Following up” for more details on what to do after you receive a Friendly Spaces report.

Taking the report

While taking a report, your job is not to determine the validity of the incident being reported. Clearly document the situation as the person describes it. Be a non-judgmental listener—people with a strong empathetic listening presence are best suited for taking reports. Take notes while you listen, or write the details down as soon as possible.

Before taking the report, confirm that the person understands the reporting process.

Review the actions that will be taken if the person makes a report.

I want to make sure you know who will have access to a report if you make one.
You will be consulted before further actions are taken.
(Clarify that illegal activity will be reported to authorities.)

Set reasonable expectations about what kind of protection and support the person will receive after making the report.

Use mirroring and clarifying questions to make sure you are correctly understanding the story.

The incident happened as soon as you entered the room. Did I get that right?
Do you remember anything else that was said?

Avoid making interpretive comments like:

"This doesn't make sense to me"; "Are you sure they said that?"; "That seems out of character for that person"

Have the person review what you have written for accuracy before finalizing the report.

Acknowledge their emotions and offer support.

I know that this experience was upsetting and stressful.
It looks like you are having a hard time. Is there anyone that you would like to be present while you make this report?

Assure the participant that you have heard their complaint and will take action.

Give a timeframe for next steps. You do not need to commit to what action will be taken. See “Taking action” for examples of what you can do depending on the situation.

Thank you for reporting this. We will use it to take the appropriate actions as soon as we can.

採取行動

Having a Friendly Space Policy is a great first step towards keeping an event safe. To be fully effective, however, it requires organizers to know how to handle threats to event safety.
  1. Exercise civility. Treat others with kindness and respect. Sensitive topics that are more prone to causing offense (i.e. religion, politics, nationality, etc.) should be treated with extra diplomacy and care.
  2. Be considerate of physical boundaries. Boundaries vary from person to person and from culture to culture.  Use extra sensitivity in relation to others’ physical spaces. Ask permission rather than assuming that others are comfortable with touch, including well-intentioned hugs, kisses on cheeks, etc.
  3. Be an ally. If you experience or witness someone making a hurtful comment, remind the person about the Friendly Space policy and ask them, kindly but firmly, to stop. Keep in mind that in some cases people may not realize that their actions or words are hurtful. Consider ways to support the recipient of the comment, as appropriate.
  4. Inform event organizers. Inform event staff as soon as possible after you witness an incident so they can take appropriate action promptly. Early intervention may prevent escalation of behavior.
Level of severity Description 舉例 What should organizers do when an incident is reported?
Low Comments made that do not directly target a specific person or persons but cause offense. Offense appears to be unintended or perhaps not even understood by the speaker. An audience participant makes a series of disgruntled comments at a presentation.

A participant enters others’ physical spaces, making them uncomfortable.

Remind those involved of the Friendly Space Policy. Explain why certain actions or words might make others uncomfortable. This interaction should be respectful, with an assumption that the offense was not intended.
Medium Comments made that are intended to offend or attack fellow attendees. Behavior that is considered antisocial or unwarranted, or which has already been warned against in the past. A participant aggressively confronts another attendee about their editing and continues after being told to stop.

A participant continues to take photographs of people without consent after being asked to stop.

Individuals who violate the Friendly Space Policy on multiple occasions may be politely yet explicitly told to leave. If the person refuses or becomes aggressive, contact venue security or the police.
High Behavior is targeted and has a high chance of resulting in physical or mental harm to the person targeted. Behavior violates applicable laws, or is an repeated pattern of Friendly Space concerns that have resulted in prior warnings. A participant repeatedly touches another participant inappropriately.

A banned person attempts to enter the venue.

Participant must be asked firmly to leave the event. If they refuse, contact venue security or law enforcement—do not put yourself in danger.

If a report is made, it must be escalated to Wikimedia Foundation staff and, if applicable, to local law enforcement.


Following up

If an incident occurs at your event, it is valuable after the event for everyone involved to do a short review of how it was handled. Here are some suggestions for how to follow up.

Evaluate how any incidents were handled.

Depending on the size of your user group or chapter, you should write up an incident report containing information like:

  • What happened
  • Who was involved
  • What action was taken
  • What the outcome was

Learn from the experience.

Set up a time for those who dealt with the incidents to discuss what happened, or just take notes for your own evaluation.

  • What went well?
  • What could have been done better?
  • Were there any tools or resources you think would have helped?
    • Do these exist and can you arrange to have them next time?
    • Do you need to suggest they be created?
  • If you are not feeling confident about organizing more events—what do you need to gain back that confidence?

分享報告。

If the incident resulted in a report, please pass it on to your Grants Program Officer or to your Wikimedia Foundation contact. If you don't have one, you can email the Support and Safety team at ca@wikimedia.org. Providing this information to the Wikimedia Foundation will help them design better practices and resources for event organizers.

If the incident took place at a technical event, such as a hackathon, refer your report to the Technical Code of Conduct Committee.